Description

Anchoring and mooring of boats

Key locations

Anchoring and mooring takes place throughout Berwickshire and Northumberland.  Favoured sites are the Farne Islands, St Abbs and Eyemouth, plus bays throughout the coast. Anchoring is usually associated with charter dive and angling boats, plus passenger vessels although there is also the potential for passing ships to require anchoring at unplanned locations within the site from time to time.

Frequency

Mainly during the summer months

Potential issues

  • Physical damage through scouring to reefs, seabed habitat and areas of seagrass
  • Moored boats could cause bird disturbance.

Features of Marine Protected Areas which might be affected

  • Reefs
  • Seagrass (Zostera) beds
  • Sub-tidal sediments
  • Birds

Legal Responsibilities or Duties (England)

A number of legal powers or duties exist which are relevant to this activity and its management. These are summarised in the table below:

Legal Power or Duty Relevant Legislation Lead Organisation
Power for the creation of Bylaws on European Marine Sites

 

 

 

The Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2017 (Regulation 40) Marine Management Organisation
Powers for creation of Bylaws on MCZs

 

Marine and Coastal Access Act 2009 (Section 129) Marine Management Organisation

Details of Current Management (England)

There is currently limited management of anchoring within the Northumberland and North Tyneside coast.  Management tends to be restricted to the identification of specific mooring areas. No formal regulatory mechanisms, such as the creation of Bylaws, are in place and there is currently limited evidence of the impacts of anchoring on the interest features of local inshore marine protected areas. The Marine Management Organisation (MMO) has powers to make byelaws in English inshore waters to protect marine SACs and SPAs and marine conservation zones (MCZs) from activities that may harm them. MMO byelaws must help to further the conservation objectives of the site. the MMO would consider voluntary measures before making a byelaw. If a permanent byelaw is required, this would be formally consulted upon. Please see this link for further information about the byelaw making process.

The National Trust records numbers and locations of vessels anchoring around the Farne Islands and advises on suitable anchoring sites.  The Management Plan for the Farne Islands NNR, signed off by Natural England, assesses the number of vessels allowed to land and anchor.  The Trust also manages moorings in Embleton Bay.

Harbours along the Northumberland coast have designated anchoring areas. If vessels wish to stop or wait offshore, the Marine and Coastguard Agency advises on suitable anchorages. Any future creation of formalised moorings areas on intertidal or inshore waters would potentially require new permissions or consents. See under the Coastal Infrastructure and Development activity for further details.

The Royal Yachting Association (YHA) offers advice to boat users on ways to minimise the environmental impacts of moorings https://www.rya.org.uk/knowledge-advice/environmental-advice/Pages/anchoring-and-mooring.aspx

Gaps in Management (England)

Currently there is little up-to-date information about the intensity and impact of anchoring activity within inshore MPAs on the Berwickshire and Northumberland coast. Existing data on anchoring needs to be cross-referenced with data about the locations of sensitive habitats.

Legal Responsibilities or Duties (Scotland)

A number of legal powers or duties exist which are relevant to this activity and its management. These are summarised in the table below:

Legal Power or Duty Relevant Legislation Lead Organisation
Powers for the creation of Bylaws on European Marine Sites

 

 

The Conservation (Natural Habitats, &c.) Regulations 1994 (Regulation 28) Scottish Natural Heritage

Details of Current Management (Scotland)

There is currently limited management of anchoring within the Berwickshire coast. Management tends to be restricted to the identification of specific mooring areas. No formal regulatory mechanisms, such as the creation of Bylaws, are in place and there is currently limited evidence of the impacts of anchoring on the interest features of local inshore protected sites.

Eyemouth Harbour and St Abbs Harbour have designated anchoring areas identified. If vessels wish to stop or wait offshore, the Marine and Coastguard Agency advises on suitable anchorages. Any future creation of formalised moorings areas on intertidal or inshore waters would potentially require new permissions or consents. See under the Coastal Infrastructure and Development activity for further details.

The Royal Yachting Association (YHA) offers advice to boat users on ways to minimise the environmental impacts of moorings https://www.rya.org.uk/knowledge-advice/environmental-advice/Pages/anchoring-and-mooring.aspx

Gaps in Management (Scotland)

Currently there is little up-to-date information about the intensity and impact of anchoring activity within inshore MPAs on the Berwickshire and Northumberland coast. Existing data on anchoring needs to be cross-referenced with data about the locations of sensitive habitats.