Description

This section deals with the control of non-native species and measures to help prevent their introduction and spread

Key locations

Potentially anywhere on the Berwickshire and Northumberland coast

Frequency of Activity

Continuous

Potential issues

  • Spread and introduction of non-native species can cause declines local species and damage important habitats
  • Control of non-native species can have harmful effects on non-target species.
  • Pacific oysters are now settling naturally on the Solway and the Forth, and it may not be long before conditions within the Berwickshire and Northumberland coast are suitable for natural settlement.

Features of Marine Protected Areas which might be affected

  • Reefs
  • Sea caves
  • Sand and mud flats
  • Subtidal sediments
  • Inlets and bays
  • Grey seal
  • Birds (wintering and breeding)

Organisations with relevant management powers or responsibilities

Organisation Description of powers or responsibilities
NatureScot ·         Enforcement of legislation dealing with non-native species
Natural England ·         Enforcement of legislation dealing with non-native species
River Tweed Commission ·         Licencing of the introduction of live fish and live fish spawn into inland waters (Scotland)
Environment Agency ·         Licencing of the introduction of live fish and live fish spawn into inland waters (England)

 

Relevant Legislation (England)

A number of legal powers, duties or regulatory tools exist which are relevant to this activity and its management. These are summarised in the table below:

Legislation Relevant Legal Power or Responsibility
Lead Organisation(s)
Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (as amended) (Section 14) Restrictions on the introduction or sale of certain specified non-native species Natural England

Relevant Guidance, Plans or Codes (England)

The following guidance, codes, plans or strategies are also relevant to the management of this activity:

Name Description Responsible Organisation Statutory or Non-Statutory?
Tweed Catchment Biosecurity Plan Biosecurity Plan for the catchment of the River Tweed Tweed Forum Non-Statutory

Relevant Legislation (Scotland)

A number of legal powers, duties or regulatory tools exist which are relevant to this activity and its management. These are summarised in the table below:

Legislation Relevant Legal Power or Duty
Lead Organisation(s)
Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (as amended) (Section 14)

 

The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Prohibition on Sale etc. of Invasive Animal and Plant Species) (Scotland) Order 2019

Restrictions on the introduction or sale of certain specified non-native species

NatureScot

Relevant Guidance, Plans or Codes (Scotland)

The following guidance, codes, plans or strategies are also relevant to the management of this activity:

Name Description Responsible Organisation Statutory or Non-Statutory?
Tweed Catchment Biosecurity Plan Biosecurity Plan for the catchment of the River Tweed Tweed Forum Non-Statutory

Details of Current Management (England)

Legislation:

A range of legislation exists which deals with the introduction and control of non-native species. The full list for England can be found on the website of the GB Non-Native Species Secretariat http://www.nonnativespecies.org//index.cfm?pageid=67

Of the various pieces of legislation which cover this topic, The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (as amended) is probably the most important. This makes it illegal to release or allow to escape into the wild any animal which is not ordinarily resident in Great Britain and is not a regular visitor to Great Britain in a wild state, or is listed in Schedule 9 to the Act. It is also illegal to plant or otherwise cause to grow in the wild any plant listed in Schedule 9 to the Act. It also creates an offence of selling, offering or exposing for sale, or possessing or transporting for the purposes of sale, certain non-native species that are listed in Schedule 9 of the Act.

Codes of Conduct and Education:

Education plays an important role in helping people to better understand the problems that can be caused by non-native species and the need for biosecurity. Codes of Conduct are a central part of education efforts. These include the Check, Clean, Dry campaign aimed at water users.

The GB Non-Native Species Secretariat website contains a wide range of resources aimed at providing information about non-native species and their management. This includes a series of online  e-learning modules http://www.nonnativespecies.org/elearning/

A checklist of marine INNS on the Berwickshire and Northumberland coast can be found HERE

Biosecurity Plans:

The creation of Biosecurity Plans offers a way of addressing threats from non-native species at a local level. A Biosecurity Plan/Marine INNS Strategy will be produced for the inshore and estuarine waters of the Berwickshire and Northumberland coast with an anticipated completion date of April 2022.

Details of Current Management (Scotland)

Legislation:

A range of legislation exists which deals with the introduction and control of non-native species. The full list for Scotland can be found on the website of the GB Non-Native Species Secretariat http://www.nonnativespecies.org//index.cfm?pageid=498

Of the various pieces of legislation which cover this topic, The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (as amended) is probably the most important. This makes it illegal to release or allow to escape into the wild any animal which is not ordinarily resident in Great Britain and is not a regular visitor to Great Britain in a wild state, or is listed in Schedule 9 to the Act. It is also illegal to plant or otherwise cause to grow in the wild any plant listed in Schedule 9 to the Act. It also creates an offence of selling, offering or exposing for sale, or possessing or transporting for the purposes of sale, certain non-native species that are listed in Schedule 9 of the Act.

Codes of Conduct and Education:

Education plays an important role in helping people to better understand the problems that can be caused by non-native species and the need for biosecurity. Codes of Conduct are a central part of education efforts. These include the Check, Clean, Dry campaign aimed at water users.

The GB Non-Native Species Secretariat website contains a wide range of resources aimed at providing information about non-native species and their management. This includes a series of online  e-learning modules http://www.nonnativespecies.org/elearning/

A checklist of marine INNS on the Berwickshire and Northumberland coast can be found HERE

Biosecurity Plans:

The creation of Biosecurity Plans offers a way of addressing threats from non-native species at a local level. The creation of Biosecurity Plans offers a way of addressing threats from non-native species at a local level. A Biosecurity Plan/Marine INNS Strategy will be produced for the inshore and estuarine waters of the Berwickshire and Northumberland coast with an anticipated completion date of April 2022.

Gaps in Knowledge or Management (England and Scotland)

More work is needed to map the current extent of, and likely future threats from marine  non-native species in Berwickshire and Northumberland. Production of a biosecurity plan for the Berwickshire and Northumberland inshore and estuarine waters will help to address many of the outstanding issues around marine non-native species. There will remain a need for the biosecurity plan to be implemented and organisations to be supported in their biosecurity efforts. More work is needed to understand what management interventions are appropriate for certain species.